Review: Louis Vuitton Resort 2020

Vampiresque moods blended with a dose of futuristic grunge synthetise Nicolas Ghesquière’s approach in his latest show.

The French Maison of Louis Vuitton, presently marching under the realm of Nicholas Ghesquière, wrapped up another scenic show on Wednesday 8th May 2019. The Creative director is either an expert location scout or perhaps he holds a very talented one in his team. In recent seasons, the Maison has shown a large part of the collections inside the acclaimed Louvre Museum in Paris, crafting futuristic setups merged with innovative tactics, able to masterfully communicate the designer’s signature point of inspiration: mixing elements of what’s been and what’s about to come. Louis Vuitton has staged shows that encompass moods of various genres, particularly by building noteworthy runway sets that offer a refreshing and exhilarating atmosphere to each presentation.

Though, being a label renowned for its picturesque and dramatic shows, it might not come as a surprise that Ghesquière chose New York’s TWA Flight Centre (bringing 2000 guests) to host Louis Vuitton’s 2020 Resort. The airport terminal was designed in 1962 by Eero Saarinen, implying a perfect location for a collection rich in textures, prompt chromatic climaxes, and ceaseless edge. Once the airport announced that the show was about to “take-off” (yes, literally), it was obvious that the brand was willing to offer more than just pretty landscapes and flamboyant greenery. Indubitably, the whole collection felt like a remarkable homage to New York itself. If the motifs that appeared on the one-toned jackets pointed out the city’s famous buildings, it was clear that Ghesquière’s unique design lens aided to wow his crowd. Paying tribute to empowered women, accentuating a balance between masculine and feminine allure. The array of apparel happened to be eclectic, radical and tense: there were pieces like bomber jackets, tons of black leather which was also served in various hues, prominent shoulders and a pale make-up palette, adorned by a mellow touch of red lipstick. A woman that fears nothing? This was emphasized by the hair choice too, which happened to be grubby yet sleek at the same time. Glitter isn’t to be missed neither. But most importantly, the theatrical collars decked with thousands of crystals: a Fashion Editor’s all-time “wet dream”. Post-apocalyptic futurism mixed with subtle romanticism: the necklines were rather gentle, invigorated by a textural contrast as seen in some of the ensembles where velvet and leather were combined, forming a playful dosage of sartorial austerity throughout the collection. On another note, the tonal selection isn’t to be neglected: beaming neon hues and classic blacks further-provoked the moods that one could sense alongside the melancholic atmosphere brought by the background harmonies.

Words by Chidozie Obasi