Advertisement

Want: MM07 Wireless Earphones

When we first heard of wireless headphones, we were skeptical. Aren’t those things too difficult to not lose already – why burden ourselves with small, precious earplugs that surely won’t work as seamlessly as good old wire? We resisted the new Apple headphones. Purchased that weird extension chord just to keep our old plugs. But then we met MW07. The New York City-based premium audio company Master & Dynamic has raised the level of an audio product we thought we never wanted. Now we do.

READ MORE

Decolonizing the Runway: Otahpiaaki Indigenous Fashion Week

As the European fashion week scene faces its trinity days between S/S and F/W 2019 shows, a young but impactful fashion event has just taken place for the third time in Calgary, Alberta. Not only does this event present us to talented designers and new collections, it also challenges our ideas of what a fashion week is and can be. The Otahpiaaki Indigenous Beauty, Fashion and Design Week was founded three years ago at the Mount Royal University in Calgary AB, Canada. The idea came from a group of young, female fashion students, and the first show took place in the hallway of the business school. Last year the project had matured and gone from two designers in one night to fifteen designers from fifteen different nations spread over three nights of fashion. A few weeks ago, the third event was held in City Hall, Calgary, with returning artists as well as sixteen new designers. The show isn’t dictated by international fashion rules, but build on a Black Foot world view. And so Otahpiaaki is more than three days of spotlights and runway walking. A research unit of students and professors, indigenous and non-indigenous people are working together on various projects associated with the event, with the common aim to decolonize the runway. A few months ago DANSK met up with Mount Royal professor and co-founder of the event, Patricia May-Derbyshire, to learn more.

READ MORE

Henrik Vibskov Pop Up Event in Paris

The Danish doyen of avant-garde, Henrik Vibskov, is not only a purveyor of great fashion; he’s also a skilled retailer, with his Copenhagen and New York boutiques counting among our worldwide favorites. This week, our friends in Paris can enjoy a taste of his concept store magic, when he launches a temporary pop-up in the 10th arrondissement. Grab your friend and come for a drink! A bientôt!

READ MORE
Advertisement

Valentino x Tokyo: A Wabi-Sabi Lve Affair

In today’s globalized world – where it’s always fashion week somewhere – it’s easy to tire from the constant stream of shows. A spectacular resort collection unraveling out of a modernist spaceship museum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil? Seen it. A steamy, romantic couture collection presented in an ancient palazzo in Sicily, nested amongst the pine trees? Meh, done that! Corporate fashion’s love affair with destination shows easily grows boring, if not down right wrong, as seen with last week’s Dolce & Gabbana scandal in Shanghai. But yesterday, we died and went to heaven and resurrected in just seven minutes when Maison Valentino presented its pre-fall 2019 collection in an old warehouse in Tokyo – the first for the house since the 1980s.

READ MORE

Dolce & Gabbana, China, and Boycotting Fashion

Last week, a scandal ensued around the Italian fashion house Dolce & Gabbana, founded and directed by the unapologetic Italians, Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana, after a series of videos, promoting their upcoming fashion event in Shanghai, were accused of containing racist content. If a sparsely dressed Chinese girl trying to eat a giant cannolo with a pair of chop sticks, while a narrator intones, “Is it too huge for you?” (see below) wouldn’t substantiate those claims – Stefano Gabbana’s SoMe feud in the DM’s of Instagram page @dietprada certainly did the job – launching derogatory attacks on China and the Chinese people in a grotesque cascade (“eat dog shit” and “Dirty Smelling Mafia”, to give you a sample). In less than 24 hours, almost all of the show’s Chinese supermodels and celebrity A-list guests cancelled their participation, the Shanghai City Government shut the event down, and Yoox pulled all Dolce & Gabbana from their e-commerce platform. The brand themselves issued a statement that they had been hacked (although there’s proof of the opposite), and later released an excruciating apology video with the design duo, exclaiming the already iconic words: “We want to apologize to the Chinese people … Because there are so many of them!” At least D&G puts their money where their mouth is. In the aftermath of the scandal, leading to calls to boycott the brand altogether, has lead to a revived conversation about consumer power, the morals of fashion media, and how to assert politics in fashion. We guide you to some of the best reads right here.

READ MORE

IIUVO x Andreas Murkudis: The Sound of Smell

Have you ever wondered how your favorite perfume would sound, if it was a song? What about, say, a 1-hour mixtape?  Well, we have. But as of today, we no longer need to dream and imagine; a click to Soundcloud should do the job. We fell in love with London-based scent wizards IIUVO when they launched their Soigné scent last year – with notes of sandalwood, crystal violet, cyclamen and nutmeg, it’s a sensation that’s as concrete as it is abstract – and one that’s resulted in many a compliment in 2018. Their lush scented candles are equally alluring – atmospheric, rather; inspired by affective memories, the scents crawl under your skin like a long-lost lover. To further represent their aesthetic universe, they recently tapped Berlin-based designer, shop owner (and DANSK friend) Andreas Murkudis to house a sonic landscape of their various scents, matching each fragrance concept with a state of the heart, measured by its BPM. This has resulted in a mixtape that crawls ambiently from Soigné’s familiar 60-90 BPM to Gilot‘s more up-beat terrain – and ending with Fonteyn‘s 120+ BPM bangers. Perfect for your morning, your day, your evening. We’ve fallen in love once again. Listen below. 

READ MORE
Advertisement

Sneak Peek into Ole Lynggaard's New Book of Inspiration

This November, jewellery brand Ole Lynggaard Copenhagen provides their customers with an early Christmas present: an insight into their spellbound universe. The Sketchbook, it is called, and it is best described – as the brand’s creative director Charlotte Lynggaard does it – “a crucible of ideas”. It centres round the elements of inspiration that Charlotte and father Ole have used through their ongoing work and collaboration. Squiggles and sketches, raw materials and book pressed flowers, anything that might serve as an element in a future piece of jewellery, is represented in the book, because as, the one half of the duo said herself, “new ideas don’t know the clock”.

READ MORE

DANSK Loves XIMONLEE

The current dynamics of the fashion industry – increasingly manifesting online – are producing perfect habitats for young labels with a great creative potential to reach a global market. With an avant-garde aesthetic, Ximon Lee has spawned a distinct profile in just a few years, with each collection emerging from in-depth research. Before XIMONLEE, and even before finishing his degree at Parsons Design School in New York, Ximon won Parsons Menswear Designer of the Year Award with his graduation collection. Further still, he went on to win the H&M Design Award, garnering international attention. He’s known for making avant-garde wearables, brilliant craftsmanship, and critically exploring important topics such as cultural heritage and senses of belonging. Creativity and authenticity often lose their value as a brand begins to grow. What does it take, then, to be part of an international form of cultural production that constantly struggles between being a from of art or being labeled as mere branding? Ximon Lee has been through all these different stages within his short but impressive career. This provided him with an unique experience that created XIMONLEE, where his knowledge of a consumer driven market is combined with an belief in high-concept design. Thus, his garments are characterised by an interplay of exaggerated shapes that are not assigned to a certain gender. His work imposes a constant exchange of traditional refinement and context with a postmodern philosophy that deconstructs the purpose and aesthetic of the pieces. It’s always discussed what fashion should be, could become. Today, young fashion’s biggest hurdle is facing the increasingly corporatized industry, where conglomerates sit heavily on the market. What is the right way to sustain a fashion brand? DANSK had the opportunity to meet with Ximon in Shanghai to get a glimpse into the label that is not easily put in a box, lead by a tremendous design talent and a global citizen.

READ MORE

Menswear Archivist David Casavant Launches Book

l68a3038 2Fashion’s got archive fever – a brief look at the contemporary fashion world will easily prove that to you. From the research-driven fashion Instagram accounts of archivings.stack (for all the Margiela looks you’re too young to have ever encountered), rarebooksparis (for an endless stream of fashion books you didn’t realize you needed) and of course dietprada (reminding everyone of fashion’s tendency to copy shamelessly), it’s clear that fashion loves research. No, Kanye West wasn’t crazy when he published 99 looks from an old Margiela lookbook during a breakdown in 2016 – he was obsessing over a better time of dress! Our own favorite archivist is David Casavant, the self-made stylist and accumulator of precious menswear based in New York (we featured him in and old issue – off you go, researcher!). What began as a fad during his adolescent has turned into a successful business, lending frequently to the industry’s top stylists as well as to celebs like Rihanna, Kim Kardashian, and, well, Kanye. Deeply connected to the city’s art and fashion worlds, Casavant has used his extraordinary archive to work with artists, stylists and photographers to re-interpret and communicate the invaluable material history on which he sits; and now, this has materialized into a beautiful coffee-table book.

READ MORE
Advertisement

Filippa K, on Her 25 Year Anniversary

18-Flippa-HeadshotsContrary to popular belief, “Scandi chic” does not hail from the DNA of the Nordic people – in fact, we have a generation of designers to thank from that, most of all Filippa K. For 25 years, the Stockholm label have been produced effortlessly chic and comfortable clothing that feels seasonless and timeless – factors that are important not only for great taste, but a sustainable wardrobe. Having long been an upper high-street favorite (the brand boasts 50 brand stores around the world), it is indeed sustainability that has become Filippa K’s new point of pride, radically transforming the way they produce, distribute and recycle clothing, while aiming for a 100% sustainable collection by 2030. Earlier this year, the brand saw the return of their founder and creative director Filippa Knutsson to steer its creative future. What’s life like at 25? Find our conversation below.

READ MORE
Previous page
    
Next page